Archive | history textbook topics

Churchill & Kilmeade Books on The Historic Danger of Islam

 

By Bill Korach www.thereportcard.org

Although radical violent Islam is resurgent in the 21st Century it has been in existence for hundreds of years. Three fascinating books, The River War and The Malakand Field Force by Winston Churchill written 120 years ago, and Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates by Brian Kilmeade should be in anyone’s library that wants to understand the subject. The books can be ordered by clicking on the title links

 

Churchill diagnosed the dangers of radical Islam.

In September 1898, the 23-year-old Churchill was one of the officers leading the 21st Lancers cavalry charge that secured a British victory over 19th century Islamic terrorists at the Battle of Omdurman in Sudan.

Some 13 years earlier Muhammad Ahmad, “the Mahdi of Allah,” had established the first modern Islamic caliphate governed by sharia law when he beheaded British General George Gordon after his dervish jihadi army captured Khartoum. Only superior British military power stopped Ahmad’s successor, Ibn Muhammad, from spreading the caliphate throughout Africa, and elsewhere.

The River War, Churchill’s account of the British retaking of Sudan, published in 1899, Churchill noted the threat to Western Civilization radical Islam poses:

“Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the Queen: all know how to die: but the influence of the religion paralyzes the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytising faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science—the science against which it had vainly struggled—the civilisation of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilisation of ancient Rome.

(emphasis added)

Islam, Churchill wrote, “is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog.”

How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedanism law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property–either as a child, a wife, or a concubine — must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men.

Writing earlier in the River War, the conduct of the Mahdi who led this modern caliphate was beneath contempt, in Churchill’s view:

“After the fall of Khartoum and the retreat of the British armies the Mahdi became the absolute master of the Soudan. Whatever pleasures he desired he could command, and, following the example of the founder of the Mohammedan faith, he indulged in what would seem to Western minds gross excesses. He established an extensive harem for his own peculiar use, and immured therein the fairest captives of the war.

In his first book, a description of British battles in Afghanistan, The Story of the Malakand Field Force, an Episode of Frontier War, published a year earlier in 1898, Churchill explained how local tribesmen were mesmerized by the call of Islam:

 

“The Mullah will raise his voice and remind them of other days when the sons of the prophet drove the infidel from the plains of India, and ruled at Delhi, as wide an Empire as the Kafir holds to-day: when the true religion strode proudly through the earth and scorned to lie hidden and neglected among the hills: when mighty princes ruled in Bagdad, and all men knew that there was one God, and Mahomet was His prophet. And the young men hearing these things will grip their Martinis, and pray to Allah, that one day He will bring some Sahib (prince) – best prize of all – across their line of sight at seven hundred yards so that, at least, they may strike a blow for insulted and threatened Islam.

Churchill compared Islam unfavorably to Christianity:

 

Indeed it is evident that Christianity, however degraded and distorted by cruelty and intolerance, must always exert a modifying influence on men’s passions, and protect them from the more violent forms of fanatical fever, as we are protected from smallpox by vaccination. But the Mahommedan religion increases, instead of lessening, the fury of intolerance. It was originally propagated by the sword, and ever since, its votaries have been subject, above the people of all other creeds, to this form of madness.

In the same book, Churchill also offered this on Islam:

 

That religion, which above all others was founded and propagated by the sword—the tenets and principles of which are instinct with incentives to slaughter and which in three continents has produced fighting breeds of men—stimulates a wild and merciless fanaticism. The love of plunder, always a characteristic of hill tribes, is fostered by the spectacle of opulence and luxury which, to their eyes, the cities and plains of the south display. A code of honour not less punctilious that that of old Spain is supported by vendettas as implacable as those of Corsica.”

Brian Kilmeade known to many as co-host of Fox & Friends and host of his radio talk show has written a fascinating history of Thomas Jefferson’s response to the Muslim Barbary Pirates attacks on United Sates shipping and the capture of the frigate USS Philadelphia. The Muslim’s felt that Christians were fair game for their piracy and depredations. President Jefferson had enough.

 

When Thomas Jefferson became president in 1801, America was deeply in debt, with its economy and dignity under attack. Pirates from North Africa’s Barbary Coast routinely captured American merchant ships and held the sailors as slaves, demanding ransom and tribute payments far beyond what the new country could afford.

For fifteen years, America had tried to work with the four Muslim powers (Tripoli, Tunis, Algiers, and Morocco) driving the piracy, but negotiation proved impossible. Realizing it was time to stand up to the intimidation, Jefferson decided to move beyond diplomacy. He sent the U.S. Navy and Marines to blockade Tripoli—launching the Barbary Wars and beginning America’s journey toward future superpower status.

Few today remember these men and other heroes who inspired the Marine Corps hymn: “From the Halls of Montezuma to the Shores of Tripoli, we fight our country’s battles in the air, on land and sea.” Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates recaptures this forgotten war that changed American history with a real-life drama of intrigue, bravery, and battle on the high seas.

 

These wonderful books make great gifts for young people, but read them yourself first!

 

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Florida Citizens Alliance New Objectionable Materials Report

 

By Bill Korach www.thereportcard.org

 

The Florida Citizens Alliance (FCA)has been in the forefront of combatting Common Core and objectionable materials that plague the classroom like an unstoppable virus. FCA have issued a new report that every family should read titled the Florida Curriculum Assessment. The 11 page report describes six categories of objectionable materials:

 

  • English Language Arts
  • Pornography
  • Reconstructed History and
  • Advanced Placement US History (APUSH)
  • Religious Indoctrination
  • Political Indoctrination
  • Common Core Math Methodologies

Rep. Lee is sponsoring HB 989 that will require all county school districts to make materials available for families to review. The bill in being considered in this current legislative session and just in time because there are some materials in place that should not be in schools. Here are just a few quotes:

 

English Language Arts:

 

“English 3 :Florida Collections– by Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt Published-2013, is a collection of short stories. The overwhelming content of these types of stories and victimization, racism and bigotry are not teaching our children to be good citizens, but victims of an oppressive culture and with moral values that “anything goes”.

Pornography

 

These materials are available beginning with 6th graders:

 

“One Example: Title: Beautiful Bastard, Author: Christina Lauren

“He leaned close enough to bite my shoulder, whispering, ‘You fucking tease.” Unable to get close enough, I quickened my pace on his zipper, shoving his pants and his boxers to the floor. I gave his cock a hard squeeze, feeling him pulse against my palm. He forced my skirt up my thighs and pushed me back on the conference table. Before I could utter a single word, he took hold of my ankles, grabbed his cock, and took a step forward, thrusting deep inside me. I couldn’t even be horrified by the loud moan I let out – he felt better than anything. ‘What’s that?’ he hissed through his clenched teeth, his hips slapping against my thighs, driving him deep inside. ‘Never been fucked like this before, have you? You wouldn’t be such a tease if you were being properly fucked.”

Revisionist History

 

“Modern World History, 9th Grade Teacher Edition Year: 2013

Author: Holt McDougal Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

The most objectionable portions of the book were the sections on the American Revolution and Founding Principles. In the discussion of the Articles of Confederation, the commentary distorts the extensive back and forth between the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists
-no mention of the 13 colonies declaring their independence as 13 independent Nation States, each with powers of the other nations states of Britain, France, etc.

-no mention of the US Constitution being a legal document that created the federal government
-No mention that the federal government was a product of this legal compact and not a signer or ratifier of the compact. -No mention that this legal compact delegated only 18 well-defined and very limited powers in Article 1, sec 8
– Minimal mention of the extensive debates that led to the Bill of Rights and particularly why we have a 9th and 10thamendment.
– Grossly miss-represented the Federalist position/Stating  “colonial leaders eventually recognized the need for a strong national government” –Not true- our Constitution was carefully crafted to limit federal government powers!”

The full report can be obtained by going to The Florida Citizens Alliance:

Oct. 2016 Objectionable Materials Curriculum Report updated

 

 

 

 

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Powers Catholic High School Educates Great Writers

Powers Catholic HS Flint, MI

 

By Bill Korach www.thereportcard.org

 

Would you like your school to teach its students clear persuasive writing? That’s not such an obvious question, since so many school have reduced writing to the status of an afterthought. But Powers Catholic High School in Flint Michigan knows how grow and groom clear and persuasive writers. A good example of a Powers writer is Dylan Hernandez whose open letter to President Trump was published in the Wall St. Journal. It is published below in its entirety. I interviewed Powers Principal Sally Bartos about how Powers does it.

 

Ms. Bartos said that writing is a fundamental part of each subject discipline. Whether the class is English, history, science or math, writing is required. In science, the student might journal some research, in political science the student might be required to develop s persuasive argument as Mr. Hernandez does so successfully.

 

Ms. Bartos said that Powers builds from a traditional Catholic approach to education but is flexible in adopting programs to fit the students body of about 660 young people. She said that Powers offers an honors humanities program that strongly resembles a traditional classic form of education that includes study of ancient Greek writing, and immersion in Western thought. Of course, since Powers is a Catholic Diocesan school, the writings of St. Thomas Aquinas and other great Catholic thinks are studied.

 

Powers Catholic High School is justifiably proud of Mr. Hernandez who will doubtless go far in life. I hope he realizes his ambition of meeting with President Trump and making a deal with him to improve the City of Flint Michigan. If he does get that invitation to the White House, Principal Bartos assured me that he’d be wearing his Powers Catholic school sweater. And I hope he brings one for President Trump.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By

DYLAN HERNANDEZ Wall Street Journal

Flint, Mich.

Mr. President, last month I heard you pledge that “neglected inner cities will see a rebirth of hope, safety, and opportunity.” Please make Flint your urban-renewal flagship, where your policies demonstrate the hope, safety and opportunity you promise.

Flint faces the same abandonment, crime, blight, troubled schools, unemployment and infrastructure issues found in many major metropolitan areas. But its population of fewer than 100,000 makes a swift turnaround easier than in larger, more complex cities like Detroit or Chicago.

You were on the mark when you said leaders have “ignored the fates of our children in the inner cities.” According to Stanford research, Flint sixth-graders are more than two grade levels behind where they should be and some four levels behind sixth-graders in nearby Oakland County. Two weeks ago, one of the two remaining public high schools canceled athletics for the year due to lack of funding. The two high schools will likely consolidate this fall in a decaying 1959 building.

Even with its bruises, I love this town and intend to return after college. Flint is home to talented, modest, resilient people and pockets of optimism that make it fertile ground for federal initiatives and investment.

While Flint still has an award-winning plant making Chevy and GMC pickup trucks, the city has lost more than 70,000 factory jobs, forcing it to develop other fields including higher education and health care. It is home to a University of Michigan campus, Kettering University (one of America’s best engineering colleges), Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine, and Mott Community College. Flint also has three hospitals and Diplomat, the nation’s largest independent specialty pharmacy. There is also an active $3 billion in philanthropy headquartered here, which works with the nonprofit Uptown Reinvestment Corp. to revitalize the downtown, university and cultural areas.

 

Mr. President, you could transform Flint in record time, maybe even before the midterm election. You could encourage companies to bring manufacturing back. You could employ those who are perpetually unemployed to rid the city of​ litter and blight, a simple idea based on broken-windows theory that the mayor of Albuquerque, N.M., successfully deployed.​

Flint is one of the most dangerous cities in the country—the most dangerous per capita from 2010-12, according to the FBI. In 2012 the city had 122 police officers, down from 265 five years earlier. You could help make the city safer through federal funding to hire more police officers.

In 2016 one in 14 houses in Flint was vacant. With funding such as Hardest Hit grants, the city could tear down abandoned structures at a faster pace.

You could improve education by providing money to build a consolidated public high-school and middle-school campus. The young could also benefit from more funds for weekend and summer science and math outreach.

Mr. Trump, if you’d like to discuss this over meatloaf, my spring break is April 1-11. The White House or Mar-a-Lago?

 

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NJ School Blames Christians for Islamic Violence

Battle of Tours

Battle of Tours

 

By Bill Korach www.thereportcard.org

According to Fox News, Barbara Light of Westwood, NJ was working with her daughter on homework when she read this in a history textbook:

 

“The Christians’ harsh treatment of Muslims in the Holy Land led to bitterness that has lasted to the present,” one worksheet stated.

Another worksheet asks students to identify “one negative effect of the Crusades that has continued to the present.” The answer written on the worksheet – “the Christians harsh treatment of Muslims continues in the present day.”

 

Evidently the school’s reference to the Crusades neglected to mention that the Crusades were the result of violent Muslim conquest of the Christian Middle East starting around 600 AD. The school neglected to mention that the entire region we know today as the Islamic Middle East and Turkey were once Christian. The school neglected to mention that the assault and conquest of those Christian regions was entirely by the sword and unprovoked.

 

The Islamic conquest of Christian nations went all the way to Spain. The Muslims would have taken all of Europe but they finally defeated by Charles Martel in 732 at the Battle of Tours, France.

 

The second part of the worksheet in the Westwood School stating, “the Christians harsh treatment of Muslims continues in the present day” is an utter fiction. Where today are Christians treating Muslims harshly? In fact it is ancient Christian communities in Iraq, Pakistan, Iran, Syria, and even Africa that are being driven out by Muslims, when they are not being murdered by various Islamic.

 

The idea that Christians have caused all of todays Islamic violence is a fiction written into American textbooks by Muslim propagandists. A full report on Islamic indoctrination of K-12 students and tainted textbooks is available from Citizens for National Security at no charge. Parents should arm themselves from this kind of dangerous Muslim propaganda.

 

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The Left’s Hijacking of English: Liberal and Conservative

The Left Says that Conservatives are like Nazis

The Left Says that Conservatives are like Nazis

 

By Bill Korach www.thereportcard.org

 

The Left has severely distorted both the meaning of “liberal” and “conservative” in ways that benefit their political agenda. The new definitions that the left has created are applied across the board on campus, in K-12 and across the media. The noun and the adjective “liberal” traditional has meant the idea that one is open to new ideas or the expression of those idea. A liberal education, for example, is an education that broadens a person and expands their level of learning. The more usage of “liberal” as defined by the left, is quite the reverse of the original intention. Today, to be a liberal or an extreme liberal on a college campus, means that one supports speech codes and censorship. If you are a non-tenured instructor or professor, you better tow the liberal line or you are out: O-U-T! That is a most illiberal form of being liberal.

 

Speech codes, safe spaces, and micro-aggressions as practiced by Yale, Dartmouth, The University of California among many other colleges are a form of severe censorship. Censorship is hardly liberal. Peter Thiel’s book: “The Diversity Myth” blasts the notion that college liberals are in fact liberal:

 

“On the very first page of their book, Sacks and Thiel commented on the double entendre implicit in the Stanford protesters’ chant of “Western Culture’s got to go.”  It was not just the required Western Culture course that was being denounced, ostensibly because most of the books studied had been written by “dead white males,” a group that was by definition considered illegitimate. Rather, it was the Western tradition as a whole.”

 

So liberals at one of America’s great institutions of learning, do not tolerate the teaching of Western Civilization any long. Another illiberal form of censorship. In fact, the word liberal has had such negative baggage for the Left that they are now calling themselves “progressive.”

 

In the meantime, the Left has totally tried to distort the meaning of “Conservative.” The left has gone to great lengths to conflate conservatism with Fascism or Nazism. Mark Tushnet, a Harvard Law professor, says that we should treat conservative Christians like Nazis.

 

Tushnet explains his unwillingness to respect the rights of the “losers”: “Trying to be nice to the losers (Christians who lost the culture wars) didn’t work well after the Civil War, nor after Brown. (And taking a hard line seemed to work reasonably well in Germany and Japan after 1945.)”

 

In todays headline, leftwing blog “Politicus usa” says: “Republicans Embrace Hitler’s Nazi Tactics to Target Muslims.” So conservative Republicans are being compared to Nazis because they want to enforce boarder security. Boarders are inherent in national sovereignty. That is a conservative and time proven. It is not Nazism.

 

But facts say that Nazism was far from a conservative philosophy. Nazi is the acronym for Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei. That’s German for National SOCIALIST Worker’s Party. So can a socialist party be considered in any way conservative. No hardly. The Nazis ran Germany like true socialists. They has a secret police; they had total control over industry; they considered Christianity weak. The Nazis took steps to take over the churches and indoctrinate their flocks. They formed the Hitler Youth and forced children to inform upon their parents. They were hardly conservative. In fact, they were violent socialists who differed from Stalin’s Communists in name only.

 

Words do have meaning, but conservatives need to be more diligent in calling out the left on their distortions and lies.

 

 

 

 

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History is Becoming History in Public Schools

The more you know about the past, the better prepared you are for the future

The more you know about the past, the better prepared you are for the future

(Editor: www.thereportcard.org More and more public schools are merging history with English language arts. As a result, history is taking a back seat to English language arts. Fewer and fewer students are learning about America’s heritage and how American government functions. What they do learn is often that American is a problem in the world and not an exceptional country. The words of Theodore Roosevelt are worth noting: “The more you know about the past, the better prepared you are for the future).”

 

by Dr. Gorman Lee External Resource EducationViews.org, Houston, Texas

Many school districts have begun to merge social studies and English language arts departments into a Humanities department, where the social studies [including history] curriculum takes a secondary role to support the English language arts curriculum.

 

The Massachusetts Board of Elementary and Secondary Education’s decision to indefinitely suspend the History and Social Science MCAS in 2009 has placed social studies education in a high risk of marginalization in K-12 public school districts across the Commonwealth. The problem has only exacerbated with increased emphases of English language arts and mathematics in the Common Core State Standards that was adopted in 2010. Therefore it comes to no surprise that once school districts have started to face budgetary constraints, social studies is now among the subject areas first on the chopping block…and it’s already happening.

There have been recent concerning reports of K-12 school districts reducing social studies departments in order to secure support to “high stakes” subject areas, despite the promised commitments to uphold civic ideals and to prepare students to become active and productive adult citizens as described in their mission statements. Many school districts have begun to merge social studies and English language arts departments into a Humanities department, where the social studies [including History] curriculum takes a secondary role to support the English language arts curriculum. In some schools, teachers whose primary subject area is other than social studies have been assigned to teach one social studies class; it now appears that “highly qualified” is no longer applicable when it comes to social studies. In some elementary schools, social studies [includes History] instruction has been reduced to no more than twenty minutes per week so that classes can spend more time for instructions in literature, mathematics, and science.

 

If we continue to allow social studies education become marginalized in our K-12 schools, our students will continue to graduate from high school with limited knowledge and understanding of their nation’s heritage, government, economy, and role in international affairs. The deterioration of a rigorous social studies curriculum will limit our students’ appreciation of community and national identity. The absence of a comprehensive K-12 social studies education will deny our students crucial learning opportunities to learn and apply higher-order critical thinking skills to address and find solutions to real world problems and issues.

Social studies educators must unite and let our elected representatives know that social studies education is facing a serious civic crisis. As President of the Massachusetts Council for the Social Studies, I am recommending that we coordinate a statewide Advocacy Day, where K-12 social studies educators schedule a meeting with their respective elected representatives at their local offices or at the Massachusetts State House in Boston.

 

If you are doing a special project with your students, I strongly encourage you to invite members of your school committee and your elected local representatives to your classroom and showcase what your students are learning in their social studies classes. It is our civic responsibility to express our collective concerns to our legislators and enlighten them on the importance and necessity to support and promote a strong K-12 social studies education in our public, charter, and private schools across the Commonwealth.

Please forward this letter to your colleagues and staff.

 

We need your help!

Sincerely,

Gorman Lee, Ed.D.

Mass Council for the Social Studies President

 

 

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Oxford to Students Radicals: “Education is not Indoctrination.”

Cecil Rhodes Empire Builder

Cecil Rhodes Empire Builder

 

(Editor: www.thereportcard.org Lord Patten, Chancellor of 900 year old Oxford University, defended the statue and the heritage of Cecil Rhodes against calls by student radicals to tear it down. Cecil Rhodes, founder of the Rhodes Scholarship, builder of the Kimberley Diamond Mines, and East African British Colonial Empire builder is of a type that is no longer fashionable in the halls of academe. Like their counterparts in America, student radicals want to rewrite history more to their liking. Unlike university administrators in America, Lord Patten, former Governor of Hong Kong, has a spine. He said: “institutions where freedom of argument and debate should be unchallenged principles”.

He warned: “One thing we should never tolerate is intolerance. We do not want to turn our university into a drab, bland, suburb of the soul where the diet is intellectual porridge.”

 

Adding: “Education is not indoctrination. Our history is not a blank page on which we can write our own version of what it should have been according to our contemporary views and prejudices.”

We wonder where such leadership exists within America’s halls of Ivy).

London Daily Telegraph

 

Lord Patten defends Oxford’s historical relationship with Cecil Rhodes saying that many of its scholars depended on activities now seen to be ‘unacceptable.’

 

Oxford University cannot rewrite history to pander to “contemporary views and prejudices”, its chancellor has warned.

Lord Patten, the former Conservative chairman, defended Oxford’s historical relationship with Cecil Rhodes saying that many of the university’s scholars depended on activities that would be “unacceptable” in the modern world.

Oxford has faced a growing campaign, led by a South African student, to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel College as part of a drive to distance the university and its curriculum from Britain’s colonial past.

 

The college has agreed to review the Rhodes statue leading to a wave of international criticism amid wider fears that universities are being undermined by political correctness.

In their first public comments on the furore both Lord Patten and the new vice-chancellor of Oxford University said that free speech was important but that history could not be rewritten.

Speaking as Professor Louise Richardson was installed as the 272nd vice-chancellor in Oxford’s history – the first woman to take the helm at the world’s second-oldest university – Lord Patten of Barnes said universities were “institutions where freedom of argument and debate should be unchallenged principles”.

He warned: “One thing we should never tolerate is intolerance. We do not want to turn our university into a drab, bland, suburb of the soul where the diet is intellectual porridge.”

 

Adding: “Education is not indoctrination. Our history is not a blank page on which we can write our own version of what it should have been according to our contemporary views and prejudices.

“Because we value tolerance, we have to listen to people who shout – at a university, mark you – about speech crimes and ‘no platforming’. We have to listen to those who presume that they can re-write history within the confines of their own notion of what is politically, culturally and morally correct.”

Lord Patten, the former Governor of Hong Kong and chairman of the BBC Trust, pointed out that many Oxford scholars depended upon funding from activities that would be “unacceptable” in the modern world.

Many of the university’s “great buildings” were constructed using the “proceeds of activities that would be rightly condemned today”, he added.

Professor Richardson backed the view that university students should be exposed to uncomfortable views, and criticised attempts by student campaigners to censor free speech.

In her address she said: “How do we ensure that they appreciate the value of engaging with ideas they find objectionable, trying through reason to change another’s mind, while always being open to changing their own? How do we ensure that our students understand the true nature of freedom of inquiry and expression?”

 

Professor Richardson, the former vice-chancellor at St Andrews University, said universities should be places where students are encouraged to think “critically” in light of a push from students to create “safe spaces” at institutions.

She said: “If we can provide leaders for tomorrow who have been educated to think critically, to act ethically and always to question, these are the people who will prevent the next financial crisis; who will help us grapple with the fundamental questions prompted by the accelerating pace of technological change, as we confront profound ethical choices about the prolongation and even replication of life.”

 

Last month The Telegraph highlighted how many American universities are being ruled by political correctness. It was revealed that students at Harvard had asked for rape law to be dropped from lectures in case any students had been victims of sexual assault.

The issue of political correctness has since spread to the UK with a number of people, including Germaine Greer, and and objects such as pop songs and sombreros banned from campuses.

 

The issue of freedom of speech being curtailed has been raised by scholars and activists. Last month, leading British professors wrote to the the Daily Telegraph to condemned campus censorship of anything that causes the least offence.
The letter said a whole generation of students is being denied the “intellectual challenge of debating conflicting views” because self-censorship is turning campuses into over-sanitised “safe spaces”.

Their intervention emerged as Oriel College considered removing a historic statue of Cecil Rhodes, one of its alumni and benefactors, because he is regarded as the founding father of colonial South Africa.

A senior source at Historic England, which will be consulted if the college decides to remove the statue, has suggested its removal would be nearly impossible because of the intricate relationship with the architecture and history of the listed building where it sits.

 

Professor Richardson, the first woman to hold the post of Vice-Chancellor at Oxford, spoke as she was admitted to office at a ceremony in the Sheldonian Theatre, in front of Congregation, the University’s parliament.

The Chancellor of Oxford University has said that “ill-considered actions” in the name of social mobility “may cast doubt on the ability of some who study” at elite universities “to gain a place… on their own merits”.

He said: “We know we have a role to play in enhancing social inclusion in Britain.

“We know that we have to be even more resourceful and generous in promoting diversity in social background, gender, race and ethnicity.

“But we should not be harried into ill-considered actions that threaten the quality of what and how we teach; actions moreover which may cast doubt on the ability of some who study here to gain a place at this university on their own merits.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Common Core Publisher Makes Money When Kids Fail

 

Unknown

(Editor: www.thereportcard.org Pearson, the notorious Common Core textbook publisher and Common Core testing developer is forcing students to re-take tests for profit. According to Alan Singer of Hofstra University Pearson’s profits are all from student exam fees, which means Pearson makes its money when students fail. According to UUP Vice President for Academics Jamie Dangler “This means Pearson has little incentive to fix flawed exams, since they profit when students take and retake them. With four new teacher certification exams in New York State administered by Pearson, students can spend up to $1,000 or more to take and retake tests.” Pearson, their flawed biased textbook, unethical sales practices and damaging testing processes should be barred as a supplier to public schools).

 

By Alan Singer Hofstra University

 

New York State, in partnership with Pearson Education, is making it increasingly harder and more expensive to become a teacher without evidence that their demands and tests will improve education in the state. Last April Governor Cuomo smuggled a requirement into the state budget without discussion or input from professional educators arbitrarily mandating that students admitted to Schools of Education have a minimum 3.0 undergraduate grade point average and take a nationally normed test. No one demonstrated that a 3.1 GPA makes you a better teacher than someone with a 2.9 GPA or how the tests align with performance as a teacher.

In addition, New York State requires that certification candidates complete four other exams either created or administered by Pearson. Three are written exams and one involves a complex portfolio submission. New York State has already been cited twice by a federal court for racial bias in its teacher certification requirements because of the “unlawful disparate impact” of its teacher certification exams.

The portfolio part of the teacher certification requirement is known as the edTPA. edTPA was created at Stanford University by a sub-division called SCALE and is administered and graded by Pearson. Essentially SCALE, Pearson, and New York State decided to replace student teacher evaluations by university field supervisors and cooperating teachers with an electronic portfolio, supposedly to ensure higher standards. The SCALE/Pearson edTPA electronic portfolio includes lesson planning, a discussion of student teaching placement sites, videos of candidates interacting with K-12 students, their personal assessment of the lesson, and documentation of student learning. While each piece by itself makes sense, the package, which focuses on just three lessons and can be sixty pages long, takes so much time to complete that it detracts from the ability of student teachers to learn what they are supposed to learn, which is how to be effective beginning teachers who connect with students and help students achieve.

 

New York State United University Professions, the union that represents faculty at the State University of New York, has been trying to understand the reasoning behind these exams. They submitted a Freedom of Information Law request to the State Education Department so they could evaluate the state’s teaching certification exam contract with Pearson. The original response from the state was a useless document, heavily redacted. It was nearly 75% blacked-out including 25 entire pages. UUP appealed and finally received a copy of the Pearson contract with most of the information visible.

Now we know what New York State and Pearson were trying to hide.

New York does not pay Pearson to develop and administer the teacher certification exams. Pearson’s profits are all from student exam fees, which means Pearson makes its money when students fail. According to UUP Vice President for Academics Jamie Dangler “This means Pearson has little incentive to fix flawed exams, since they profit when students take and retake them. With four new teacher certification exams in New York State administered by Pearson, students can spend up to $1,000 or more to take and retake tests.”

UUP wants to stop Pearson and other for-profit testing companies from making money off of students by charging and recharging to take mandatory exams. Instead, the State Education Department should pay companies to develop tests and collect the administration fees from students.

Judge Kimba Wood of the Federal District Court in Manhattan through out earlier New York State teacher certification exams developed by a Pearson subsidy as “racially discriminatory.” I do not know the legal grounds she can use, but teachers and students need her to act again. Pearson! Pearson! Pearson! Pearson! Why does anybody have anything to do with this company?

I thank Diane Ravitch for bring this to my attention. Anyone ambitious enough can read the actual New York State Pearson contract. I am sending this post to Pearson officials. Let’s see if they respond.

 

 

 

 

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Support Florida SB 1018-Stop Rotten Textbooks

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By Bill Korach www.thereportcard.org

In 2014, Gov. Scott signed SB 864 into law. It was an excellent bill that took power away from Tallahassee educrats and placed it in the hands of local parents and citizens. It was supposed to:

  • Assign each school board the constitutional responsibility to select and provide adequate instructional materials.
  • Require each district to create a transparent review policy/process allowing parents to review instructional materials and raise objections if the material was not accurate or was objectionable.
  • Allow School districts to implement their own selection and purchase programs as an alternative to buying from the State approved lists.

Florida State Rep. Marlene O’Toole watered down the bill so local school boards could operate in secret. She continues to fight SB 1018 because she apparently favors the textbook companies. It is NO secret that there are many textbooks that are dishonest about American History, pornographic and have a pro-Islam, anti Christian bias. Keith Flaugh of Florida Citizens Alliance has provide some examples of rotten textbooks that are currently in the classroom:

At Gulf Coast High School in AP English, the syllabus requires the kids to read:

Angela’s Ashes, which includes alcoholism, marital infidelity, abandonment, promiscuity, and masturbation.

They are required to read the article “Shitty First Drafts”.

They read “Bullet in the Brain”, a story about a man’s last thoughts as a bullet enters his brain.

They also read “Body Rituals among the Nacirema” (Indians) which discusses sadism, masochism, defecating in front of others, obsessing about breast size, and customs concerning intercourse.

Here is an example of 6th grade summer school reading from Collier County. Warning: it contains foul language and pornography:

Beautiful Bastard, Author: Christina Lauren
“He leaned close enough to bite my shoulder, whispering, ‘You fucking tease.” Unable to get close enough, I quickened my pace on his zipper, shoving his pants and his boxers to the floor. I gave his cock a hard squeeze, feeling him pulse against my palm. He forced my skirt up my thighs and pushed me back on the conference table. Before I could utter a single word, he took hold of my ankles, grabbed his cock, and took a step forward, thrusting deep inside me. I couldn’t even be horrified by the loud moan I let out – he felt better than anything. ‘What’s that?’ he hissed through his clenched teeth, his hips slapping against my thighs, driving him deep inside. ‘Never been fucked like this before, have you? You wouldn’t be such a tease if you were being properly fucked.

 

Out of Many: Authors: Faragher, Buhle, Czitrom, Armitage   Publisher: Pearson Lee County

The book has 4 authors so we don’t know who wrote any of it. One author, Buhle, has a background showing extreme left bias. She authored “Women and American Socialism,” “Feminism and its Discontents, “ “A Century of Struggle with Psychoanalysis” and is the co-editor of the “Encyclopedia of the American Left.” Armitage also has that bias. They all seem to focus on the negative aspects of American history, class struggles, oppression and prejudice, rather than the hope, opportunity and justice of America.

This is confirmed by the review of this book in the College Board Web Site itself, which says, ‘Teachers considering the purchase of Out of Many should be aware that the book has become part of the textbook culture wars. Traditionalists who want democracy and free enterprise presented more favorably are bothered by what they see at left-leaning texts that pay too much attention to the dark side of American history. These individuals put Out of Many in this category.”

SB 1018, co sponsored by Sen. Gaetz will plug the loopholes and ensure that school district give parents the opportunity to vet textbooks before they are placed in front of out kids.

 

 

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The Real Thanksgiving Story

 

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(Editor: www.thereportcard Nathaniel Morton recorded the account of William Bradford of the journey of the Pilgrims, our courageous founders. Although they are much maligned on campus, and in the mainstream media, they gave true meaning and texture to what became the First Amendment. One cannot read these words and fail to understand what makes us exceptional and the hope of the world.  The Wall Street Journal has printed this chronicle and editorial since 1961, and everyone, particularly young Americans should learn it by heart).

 

The Desolate Wilderness

 

Here beginneth the chronicle of those memorable circumstances of the year 1620, as recorded by Nathaniel Morton, keeper of the records of Plymouth Colony, based on the account of William Bradford, sometime governor thereof:

So they left that goodly and pleasant city of Leyden, which had been their resting-place for above eleven years, but they knew that they were pilgrims and strangers here below, and looked not much on these things, but lifted up their eyes to Heaven, their dearest country, where God hath prepared for them a city (Heb. XI, 16), and therein quieted their spirits.

When they came to Delfs-Haven they found the ship and all things ready, and such of their friends as could not come with them followed after them, and sundry came from Amsterdam to see them shipt, and to take their leaves of them. One night was spent with little sleep with the most, but with friendly entertainment and Christian discourse, and other real expressions of true Christian love.

The next day they went on board, and their friends with them, where truly doleful was the sight of that sad and mournful parting, to hear what sighs and sobs and prayers did sound amongst them; what tears did gush from every eye, and pithy speeches pierced each other’s heart, that sundry of the Dutch strangers that stood on the Key as spectators could not refrain from tears. But the tide (which stays for no man) calling them away, that were thus loath to depart, their Reverend Pastor, falling down on his knees, and they all with him, with watery cheeks commended them with the most fervent prayers unto the Lord and His blessing; and then with mutual embraces and many tears they took their leaves one of another, which proved to be the last leave to many of them.

 

Being now passed the vast ocean, and a sea of troubles before them in expectations, they had now no friends to welcome them, no inns to entertain or refresh them, no houses, or much less towns, to repair unto to seek for succour; and for the season it was winter, and they that know the winters of the country know them to be sharp and violent, subject to cruel and fierce storms, dangerous to travel to known places, much more to search unknown coasts.

Besides, what could they see but a hideous and desolate wilderness, full of wilde beasts and wilde men? and what multitudes of them there were, they then knew not: for which way soever they turned their eyes (save upward to Heaven) they could have but little solace or content in respect of any outward object; for summer being ended, all things stand in appearance with a weatherbeaten face, and the whole country, full of woods and thickets, represented a wild and savage hew.

If they looked behind them, there was a mighty ocean which they had passed, and was now as a main bar or gulph to separate them from all the civil parts of the world.

 

And The Fair Land

 

Any one whose labors take him into the far reaches of the country, as ours lately have done, is bound to mark how the years have made the land grow fruitful.

This is indeed a big country, a rich country, in a way no array of figures can measure and so in a way past belief of those who have not seen it. Even those who journey through its Northeastern complex, into the Southern lands, across the central plains and to its Western slopes can only glimpse a measure of the bounty of America.

And a traveler cannot but be struck on his journey by the thought that this country, one day, can be even greater. America, though many know it not, is one of the great underdeveloped countries of the world; what it reaches for exceeds by far what it has grasped.

So the visitor returns thankful for much of what he has seen, and, in spite of everything, an optimist about what his country might be. Yet the visitor, if he is to make an honest report, must also note the air of unease that hangs everywhere.

For the traveler, as travelers have been always, is as much questioned as questioning. And for all the abundance he sees, he finds the questions put to him ask where men may repair for succor from the troubles that beset them.

His countrymen cannot forget the savage face of war. Too often they have been asked to fight in strange and distant places, for no clear purpose they could see and for no accomplishment they can measure. Their spirits are not quieted by the thought that the good and pleasant bounty that surrounds them can be destroyed in an instant by a single bomb. Yet they find no escape, for their survival and comfort now depend on unpredictable strangers in far-off corners of the globe.

How can they turn from melancholy when at home they see young arrayed against old, black against white, neighbor against neighbor, so that they stand in peril of social discord. Or not despair when they see that the cities and countryside are in need of repair, yet find themselves threatened by scarcities of the resources that sustain their way of life. Or when, in the face of these challenges, they turn for leadership to men in high places—only to find those men as frail as any others.

 

So sometimes the traveler is asked whence will come their succor. What is to preserve their abundance, or even their civility? How can they pass on to their children a nation as strong and free as the one they inherited from their forefathers? How is their country to endure these cruel storms that beset it from without and from within?

Of course the stranger cannot quiet their spirits. For it is true that everywhere men turn their eyes today much of the world has a truly wild and savage hue. No man, if he be truthful, can say that the specter of war is banished. Nor can he say that when men or communities are put upon their own resources they are sure of solace; nor be sure that men of diverse kinds and diverse views can live peaceably together in a time of troubles.

But we can all remind ourselves that the richness of this country was not born in the resources of the earth, though they be plentiful, but in the men that took its measure. For that reminder is everywhere—in the cities, towns, farms, roads, factories, homes, hospitals, schools that spread everywhere over that wilderness.

We can remind ourselves that for all our social discord we yet remain the longest enduring society of free men governing themselves without benefit of kings or dictators. Being so, we are the marvel and the mystery of the world, for that enduring liberty is no less a blessing than the abundance of the earth.

And we might remind ourselves also, that if those men setting out from Delftshaven had been daunted by the troubles they saw around them, then we could not this autumn be thankful for a fair land.

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